Toilet Guide: Nepal

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We love Nepal. We know, we say that about every country, but the people in Nepal are seriously amazing. Every person we had the privilege of speaking to in Nepal was incredibly kind and welcoming, and just unbelievably generous. But enough about the people, let’s talk about the toilets.

Quick guide:

  • Pretty much all guesthouses in Nepal aimed at a western audience will have clean sit-down toilets, as will more upmarket cafes and restaurants.
  • Squat toilets are commonly used by most locals, particularly in rural areas. This means you’re very likely to encounter a squat toilet during your stay. If you’re not sure how to use a squat toilet, check out our comprehensive guide.
  • Bring your own toilet paper with you everywhere, unless you’re cool with using the bucket in a bucket cleaning method.
  • Plumbing in Nepal cannot handle toilet paper being flushed down the toilet. This means you need to put all used toilet paper in the bins provided. Yes we know this seems gross.

Toilets in guest houses

We found that budget guest houses in Nepal have pretty reasonable toilet facilities. Aside from the cheapest of the cheap guest houses, western sit down toilets were very common, especially in any place marketed towards a western backpacker audience. You could pay a little more for a private ensuite bathroom, or opt for a shared bathroom if your budget was a bit tighter. We stayed in a lovely guest house in Pokhara, for £3 each per night, which had a very clean ensuite toilet and shower with hot water. The sit down toilet was accompanied by a bum-gun, which seems quite typical for urban dwellings in Nepal. This price also seemed pretty typical, with many backpackers actually commenting that it was a little expensive. Nepal is a very cheap country to travel in!
Note: We were there just prior to to the devastating 2015 earthquake, but we know plenty of people who have visited post-earthquake and they assure us Nepal is still awesome.


Toilets out and about

nepalblog_durbarsq

When out and about exploring Nepal, you can’t guarantee where your next toilet is coming from. We didn’t encounter a single public toilet in Nepal. Nor can you expect that restaurants and cafes will have toilets, especially if you plan to try the street food. That said, any slightly more upmarket place, or anywhere aimed at backpackers will likely have a sit-down toilet. If you’re very lucky, they might also have the fanciest tap you ever saw:

nepalblog_fancytap

So, you might only have great toilet experiences, but we do recommend you practice your squatting! It’s easy to get caught short in Nepal, and you may well have to duck into the nearest cafe to use their facilities. We found everyone was happy for us to use their toilets though, so don’t be afraid to ask.


On the road

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Travel days generally pose the most challenges for toilet access. A “travel day” is when you’ve checked out of your accommodation and are moving to the next town with all your luggage in tow. These days are when you have the least control over your access to toilets.

In our experience, overland buses in Nepal are generally great. With one notable exception (more on this later!) We found tourist buses on the main tourist routes, such as from Kathmandu to Pokhara or to Chitwan national park, to be comfortable and reliable. Tourist buses are slightly more expensive than local buses, don’t really stop to pick up passengers (except the driver’s friends!) and have larger, more comfortable seats. None of the buses we took in Nepal had toilets on board. However, these buses did tend to stop every 3 hours or so, to give you time to use the toilet and buy snacks/ drinks.

The toilets at rest stops were always basic squat toilets, but they were free, and they were private. There tended to be a few toilets available, so queuing wasn’t too bad. Running water was generally available for hand washing, but no soap or toilet roll was provided, so make sure you have your own supply readily available.

nepalblog_squatter_nick

Provided by Nick Rogen, author of the excellent travel blog A Life Unfiltered.

Some toilet stops were yet more basic; we distinctly remember one wooden shack perched precariously on the side of a cliff on the road between Kathmandu and Pokhara. These more basic toilets were again, squat toilets, and they generally didn’t have running water available for hand washing. But they did tend to have bins for used toilet paper, which avoids that sticky situation of “I used this piece of toilet paper before I realised there is NOWHERE to put it…”


Go Go Guano top tips for overland travel in Nepal:

As when travelling in any developing country, we would always recommend you carry toilet paper and antibacterial hand gel with you at all times. That is, unless you’re happy to use the bucket in a bucket to clean yourself and adopt the “left hand for cleaning, right hand for eating” system the locals use. 

We also recommend bringing your own bar of soap in a soap box on your trip to Nepal, because sometimes you just need a proper hand wash and there’s no guarantee anywhere will provide soap. 

general_toiletkit


And finally…

Here’s a story about an interesting toilet and bus related experience Rosie had in Nepal. It explains the exception to the “buses are generally great” rule mentioned earlier… 

After Morgan went home to England, I decided to travel overland from Kathmandu to Varanasi, India by myself. This was, quite frankly a terrible idea. This 340-mile journey involved over 20 hours on buses with extremely limited toilet facilities. To put this in perspective, you could feasibly travel 340 miles in about 5 hours on good roads. It was slow going. Without Morgan to tell me what a terrible idea this was, I went into massive optimist mode, thinking things along the lines of:

Overland travel is such an enriching experience! I love overland travel. It’s so cheap and you meet fascinating people…”

So off I went.

Phase 1 of this 340-mile road trip took me to Lumbini, the fabled birthplace of Buddha in the deep South of Nepal:

nepalblog_monks

It sounded like an incredible place. But first I had to get there.

I could tell I was in for interesting journey as soon as I arrived at the bus station. As a testament to this wonderful country, my rickshaw driver helped me sort my ticket out, insisted on carrying my backpack and personally walked me to the right bus, without even expecting a tip.

The bus looked fine from the outside, but on closer inspection several things started to worry me. The seats were much smaller than an average size adult human. There was no luggage storage, so a “pile” system was created whereby everyone chucked their luggage haphazardly in the region of the gear stick. And, the journey took far longer than expected. But despite all this, I loved this bus ride for one simple reason; the people. My fellow passengers looked after me, as the only backpacker on the bus, far more than I deserved. They insisted I move seat twice, to make sure I was in the most comfortable seat on the bus. At one of the comfort breaks, I tried to buy some chai, only to find I had no change. This being Nepal, of course the vendor didn’t have change for a big note, so I smiled and said no thank you; I would get by without my chai fix. A few minutes later a local woman approached me carrying 2 steaming cups of sweet, spicy, chai. She didn’t speak English, but smiling broadly she indicated she had seen my earlier exchange and bought me a drink. We didn’t share any of the same language, but we sat and enjoyed our chai together smiling and gesturing to communicate. Nepal humbled me.

The downside of drinking chai in the middle of an all day bus ride? You need to pee.

A few hours later, my bladder painfully full, the bus pulled over for a break. But there were no toilets in sight this time. I felt fairly let down. One thing I had to learn to love about Nepal was the comfortable rest stops every few hours, with access to drinks, snacks, and squat toilets, and this more basic, local bus was not delivering.

I asked the driver, and he looked genuinely sad to tell me there were no toilets here; we had only stopped as some people needed to change bus. The bus driver took me under his wing, talked to some people, and within a few minutes, I was being shepherded into what I now realise was someone’s house, to use their toilet. I walked through their living room and kitchen, said a brief, confused hello to the family, promptly disappeared out through their back door, and into their back garden. From there I was ushered over to the family outhouse. I found a lovely clean squat toilet, and after thanking the family profusely I got back on the bus. That was it. No one asked for money. No scary situations arose involving a solo female traveller following a stranger into his house. It was just a great experience, which taught me that if in doubt, just ask for help. If you’re in Nepal, you can pretty much guarantee people will help you out.

nepalblog_streets

Unfortunately, things weren’t so fluffy and nice on Phase 2 of this trip. My final destination was Varanasi, India, and this required yet another long bus journey. Go ahead and read all about my comparatively horrifying experience here.


Planning on going trekking in Nepal?
Check back soon for our guide to using toilets while trekking!
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2 thoughts on “Toilet Guide: Nepal

  1. Thank you so much for this wonderfully presented piece. I loved reading it. I am happy that your Nepal experience was good. Your description is too kind to Nepal and its people. Also, toilet. This is a very important issue that you have talked about. There are national and regional campaigns in Nepal to declare various places open defecation free zones. The trend to build toilets and use them has greatly increased over the past decade or so. But a lot needs to be done. There are little or no public toilets in many public places in Nepal. I remember writing a front page article 12 years ago on Nepal’s largest daily newspaper to mark International Toilet Day in which I had highlighted lack of toilets in public places in Nepal. Sadly, not much has changed if you walk round in Kathmandu city. Several years ago when I was living in Delhi I wrote another blog post on another International Toilet Day arguing Delhi was comparatively better, especially if you were a man, in terms of having public urinals. Allow me to share the link to that story: https://wagle.com.np/2009/11/19/world-toilet-day-delhi-public-urinals/ I hope things will change for better in the days to come.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi Dinesh, really glad you liked the post! We agree the lack of public toilets is an important issue in Nepal. Seeing small children being encouraged to poop in the street was definitely an eye opener when we were in Kathmandu!

      Liked by 1 person

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